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Copyright 1999 - 2009 Vision Machines Inc. -  All Rights Reserved
 Tel:  (781) 275-2020  -  Fax:  (781) 275-2028  -  info@vision-machines.com
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OVERVIEW OF MACHINE VISION 
Machine vision is the use of optical non-contact sensing to automatically acquire and interpret images, in order to obtain information and/or control machines or processes.  A typical machine vision system consists of one or more monochrome or color video cameras, lighting, vision hardware (frame grabber and/or processor board), vision software (image processing/analysis), and a computer system.  Machine vision is widely deployed in industry to improve productivity and quality.  Inspection systems can process both two-dimensional and three-dimensional images using grayscale or color image analysis.  Common industrial uses of machine vision include assembly verification, defect detection, gauging, identification, alignment, robotic assembly and control, sorting/grading,  OCR/OCV, and process control.
 
Successful implementation of machine vision requires skill and knowledge in many different areas.  Among the many disciplines involved in industrial  machine vision technology are:
 
    Systems architecture design
    Image processing/image analysis
    Algorithms and software engineering
    Lighting, optics, and sensor technology
    Material handling
    Analog, digital, and video electronics
    Communications
    Industrial and manufacturing engineering
    Quality control
 
In 2004, the North American machine vision market exceeded $1.8 billion dollars, including sales from manufacturers, system integrators and OEMs.  Globally, revenues from machine vision in 2004 were approximately $8.1 billion, including value-added contributions.  Principal users of machine vision technology include the electronics, semiconductor, automotive, food, and pharmaceutical industries, but applications can be found in virtually every manufacturing industry.
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